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How Computing May Change Our World

  • September 17, 2020
  • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
  • Online

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  • Free and Open to the Public

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How Computing May Change Our World

Online via Zoom, or by Phone

Mark D. Hill

UW Madison Prof. Emeritus of Computer Sciences


FREE TO PLATO MEMBERS AND NON-MEMBERS, BUT REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED IN ORDER TO OBTAIN THE LINK TO ATTEND, OR TO SUBMIT QUESTIONS IN ADVANCE. PLEASE REGISTER Before the event starts. QUESTIONS ARE BEST SUBMITTED BEFORE MONDAY SEPTEMBER 14TH or can be written in during the event.

While computing has already changed how we communicate, work, and play, more big impacts are afoot. Prof. Hill will define and discuss impacts of three important examples on the horizon:

(a) why artificial intelligence will free humans from more repetitive tasks,

(b) how quantum computing will eventually enhance discovery, and

(c) how computing and very human issues like fairness will increasingly interact.

This talk assumes no background in computer science and is based on visioning work Prof. Hill collaborated on when he led the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) (https://cra.org/ccc/about/). He will seek to finish early to enable time for questions and discussion on computing's directions and would value any questions submitted in advance.

As the lecture is online, you can use your computer or smartphone to access the lecture and see the speaker and slides during the presentation. You will not be visible during the lecture, but you will be able to chat with the speaker by typing in your comments.

If you do not have a computer or smartphone you can also use your regular phone to dial a phone number and listen to the talk without seeing the slides.


SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Mark D. Hill (http://www.cs.wisc.edu/~markhill) is Gene M. Amdahl and John P. Morgridge Professor Emeritus in Computer Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His work targets computers with complex memory systems, multiple processing cores, and systems which do not yet exist so they have to be simulated. Over three decades, he has collaborated with over 160 co-authors, has over 40 patents, and has held several visiting positions in the computer industry, most recently as a 2018 Google Intern. He serves as Chair Emeritus of a national computing think tank--the Computing Community Consortium--and he was Wisconsin Computer Sciences Department Chair 2014-2017. Mark won the highest award in computer hardware--Eckert-Mauchly—in 2019. Mark is a fellow of his two major professional societies (ACM and IEEE), and has a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

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